The World's Columbian Exposition


The World's Columbian Exposition

In association with the Columbian Exposition, the World's Congress Auxiliary conducted 224 congresses, ranging in subject from Agriculture to Woman's Progress, at the then recently constructed Art Institute building. Printed programs show 1,283 sessions at which 5,978 addresses were delivered by 4,822 speakers. The congresses' attendance was estimated at 700,000. The most notable was the World's Parliament of Religions, which brought together religious teachers of all faiths and from all lands for a discussion of their various tenets.

The Palace of Fine Arts of 1893 is now the Museum of Science and Industry. It is the only remaining building from the fair.

The Palace of Fine Arts of 1893 is now the Museum of Science and Industry. It is the only remaining building from the fair. (photograph by Charles D. Arnold, CHS ICHi )

More than 200 buildings occupied the exposition's grounds; today, only one remains. Like most of the other buildings, the Palace of Fine Arts had exterior walls of staff, a temporary building material made from plaster of paris and hemp fiber. It housed the Field Columbian Museum after the fair's closing until 1920. During the late 1920s, the building was reduced to its steel skeleton and brick interior walls and rebuilt in stone. The structure was opened again to the public as the Museum of Science and Industry in 1931.




Al Capone
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Century of Progress
Chicago Fire
World's Columbian Expo
Expo Photo Gallery
Expo Artifacts
Expo Bibliography
Parades, Protests and Politics
The Pullman Era
The Stockyards
Fort Dearborn

Click here to see larger map of grounds.

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