Chicago's Black Sox


After The Scandal

Third baseman Buck Weaver attended meetings where the fix was planned, but refused to participate.  His was banned from the game anyway and was unsuccessful in later attempts to get reinstated. Third baseman Buck Weaver attended meetings where the fix was planned, but refused to participate. His was banned from the game anyway and was unsuccessful in later attempts to get reinstated. (CHS ICHi 23171)

Although they were banned from baseball, several of the Black Sox were unwilling to entirely give up on the sport they loved and the only profession they had ever known. While some of the players distanced themselves from baseball, Joe Jackson, Eddie Cicotte, and Swede Risberg continued to play the game in outlaw leagues or semi-professional teams. When Jackson could no longer play ball, he owned and operated a liquor store. He died in 1951, shortly after being inducted into the Cleveland Baseball Hall of Fame. Fred McMullin died in California in 1952. Buck Weaver unsuccessfully appealed several times to Judge Landis for reinstatement in the major leagues. He ran a drugstore and died of a heart attack in 1956. Lefty Williams ran a poolroom for awhile and then moved to California and managed a landscaping business. He died in 1959. Happy Felsch ran a tavern in Milwaukee and died in 1964. Eddie Cicotte was a game warden and security guard in Detroit and died in 1970. Swede Risberg worked for many years in Minnesota on a dairy farm. He died in California in 1975.

Shortstop Charles

Shortstop Charles "Swede" Risberg moved to
Wisconsin and worked a dairy farm after his
ban from baseball. (CHS SDN 61,874)





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