Chicago's Black Sox


The Trial

As High Commissioner of Base Ball,  Judge Landis was given virtually unlimited authority over the sport.

As "High Commissioner of Base Ball," Judge Landis
was given virtually unlimited authority over the sport.

After the 1920 season, fearing baseball might not survive the gambling scandal, club owners decided to clean up their act. The three-man national commission, headed by Ban Johnson, was replaced by a single, independent commissioner with dictatorial power over baseball. Federal Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis was appointed commissioner, and he acted quickly to restore the public's faith in baseball. Immediately after they were acquitted of any criminal charges, Landis banned all eight players from the game. Landis said, "regardless of the verdict of the juries, no player who throws a ball game, no player who undertakes or promises to throw a ball game, no player who sits in confidence with a bunch of crooked players and does not promptly tell his club about it, will ever play professional baseball." True to his word, Landis never allowed any of the eight White Sox to play professional ball again.

After his lifetime ban from baseball, Oscar

After his lifetime ban from baseball,
Oscar "Happy" Felsch ended up
running a tavern in Milwaukee
(CHS ICHi-20702).




Al Capone
Black Sox
Blacksox Photo Gallery
Blacksox Bibliography
Century of Progress
Chicago Fire
World's Columbian Expo
Parades, Protests and Politics
The Pullman Era
The Stockyards
Fort Dearborn

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